Patient and physician jointly take the first step towards treatment of deafblindness

Stichting Ushersyndroom finances CRUSH study

The expertise centre for Usher Syndrome in Radboudumc in Nijmegen (the Netherlands) will start a natural development study into Usher Syndrome. This is a very important step in the research into a treatment of Usher Syndrome, because this study may substantially shorten the running time for trials. Ophthalmologists and ENT specialists will together conduct this CRUSH study. Stichting Ushersyndroom will finance this five-year study with over €257,000,–, made possible by the donations and the co-financing of the Dutch Dr. Vaillantfonds and the Oogfonds.

The CRUSH study (Characterizing Rate of progression USHersyndrome) is a cooperation between the Usher Syndrome Foundation, ophthalmologists, ENT specialists and the researchers of the Radboudumc. This study will map out and analyse the natural development of the progressive disease Usher Syndrome with 50 patients for a period of five years. Children suffering from Usher Syndrome are born deaf or hard of hearing and from their teenage years their eyesight will deteriorate as well. This starts with night-blindness and an ever narrowing field of vision, which is like looking through a straw. Usher Syndrome is the most common type of deafblindness.
By starting now to properly register of the natural development researchers can determine how many people are required, what studies are to be conducted when and how long a trial must take in order to be able to unambiguously and exactly register the effect of a treatment compared with the natural development.

CRUSH study as a track-record for other eye diseases
By starting natural development studies with 50 patients suffering from Usher Syndrome a track-record is built up which can be extended in the future. By mapping out the deterioration of vision and hearing, the basis is laid for the future evaluation of the effectiveness of clinical trials related to Usher Syndrome. These experiences are not only important to patients suffering from Usher Syndrome, but to patients with other hereditary eye disorders as well. This study can be an example of how the running time can best be shortened to make sure that studies into effectiveness can be started in time.

A. van Nunen, secretary of Stichting Ushersyndroom and patient herself:

“The CRUSH study can help ophthalmologists and ENT specialists to inform patients better about the prognosis and the development of the deterioration of their eyesight and hearing, thus enabling people suffering from Usher Syndrome to better arrange their lives.”

Usher patients hope that this study will also provide an explanation of the individual differences within families and to find and answer to the question which external factors have influence on the development of the disease. For this reason a CRUSH database will be set up apart from the CRUSH study. Annouk van Nunen: ‘Knowledge about the natural development for each mutation improves the early diagnosis and guidance of young parents and the care for people suffering from Usher Syndrome. The CRUSH study can help ophthalmologists and ENT specialists to inform patients better about the prognosis and the development of the deterioration of their eyesight and hearing, thus enabling people suffering from Usher Syndrome to better arrange their lives.’
Do you want to know more about the CRUSH study and the CRUSH database? Read ‘CRUSH study and database for unraveling Usher Syndrome’